Articles Posted in Arbitration & Mediation

by
This case involved a home-improvement contract between Petitioner, a construction company, and Respondents, homeowners. Both parties argued that the other breached the contract. The superior court determined that the matter must be referred to arbitration under an arbitration provision in the contract. The arbitrator found in favor of Petitioner. Petitioner filed this action seeking to confirm the arbitration award and moved for summary judgment. Only after Petitioner filed its summary judgment motion did Respondents file an answer opposing confirmation of the award. The Court of Chancery granted the petition to confirm, holding that summary judgment was appropriate in this case. View "SC&A Constr., Inc. v. Potter" on Justia Law

by
Seller entered into a purchase agreement with Buyer for the sale of certain equipment. The purchase agreement included an arbitration clause. Buyer eventually assigned its assets for the benefit of creditors to Assignee. Assignee sold Buyer’s tangible assets but retained choses in action. Assignee later brought a complaint in arbitration seeking damages for breach of the purchase agreement. The arbitrator concluded that Assignee had standing to bring the action and that the purchase agreement conferred jurisdiction upon him to hear the matter. Seller then brought this action seeking to enjoin the arbitration. The Court of Chancery dismissed this matter for lack of subject matter jurisdiction, concluding that a complete contractual remedy existed in arbitration. View "CVD Equip. Corp. v. Dev. Specialists, Inc." on Justia Law

by
3850 & 3860 Colonial Blvd. LLC acquired an interest in Rubicon Media, LLC, a limited liability company controlled by Christopher Griffin. Griffin carried out a recapitalization of Rubicon LLC, which gave rise to Colonial’s principal claims. Rubicon LLC’s operating agreement required arbitration. Griffin later converted Rubicon LLC into Rubicon Media, Inc. At issue in this case was whether Colonial was obligated to arbitrate or whether creation of Rubicon Media as the LLC’s successor - with a charter providing exclusively for litigation - eliminated any right or duty to arbitrate. In a letter opinion, the Court of Chancery stayed proceedings pending arbitration, specifically awaiting resolution of the question of substantive arbitrability. Colonial sought certification of an interlocutory appeal of that order. The Court rejected Colonial’s application for certification of an interlocutory appeal, holding that there was an arguable basis for arbitration that raised a question for resolution in the arbitration forum. View "3850 & 3860 Colonial Blvd., LLC v. Griffin" on Justia Law

by
The parties in this case were two members of a Delaware LLC that was created to hold a subsidiary operating a wind farm on the island of Maui in Hawaii. Defendant filed an arbitration demand in Hawaii based on its understanding of the operative LLC agreement. In response, Plaintiff filed suit in the Court of Chancery seeking to enjoin the Hawaii arbitration. After the initiation of this litigation, Defendant filed a motion to compel arbitration in Hawaii. Defendant argued that the Court of Chancery should dismiss this litigation in favor of the pending Hawaii action. The Court of Chancery concluded that the parties agreed in the LLC agreement that both arbitration and questions of arbitrability shall be undertaken in a Hawaii court, and therefore, this action must be stayed or dismissed in favor of Defendant’s action currently pending in Hawaii. View "Kahuku Holdings, LLC v. MNA Kahuku, LLC" on Justia Law

by
Defendants, collectively referred to as “InterDigital,” and LG Electronics, Inc. entered into a non-disclosure agreement, titled “Agreement Governing Confidential Settlement Communications (the NDA), after LG filed a demand for arbitration with the International Centre for Dispute Resolution. InterDigital claimed that the parties did not intend to prevent the submission of pre-NDA evidence to the arbitral tribunal and disclosed in its brief to the tribunal alleged settlement communications. LG then filed this action seeking injunctive relief compelling InterDigital to withdraw its brief, claiming that InterDigital breached the NDA by submitting the documents to the arbitrators. InterDigital moved to dismiss LG’s complaint in favor of arbitration, asking the Court of Chancery to exercise its discretion under the doctrine established in McWane Cast Iron Pipe Corp. v. McDowell-Wellman Engineering Co. to dismiss the action in favor of the earlier-filed arbitral proceeding. The Court of Chancery dismissed the action in favor of the earlier-filed arbitral proceeding under the McWane doctrine, concluding that this case met the McWane doctrine’s requirements. View "LG Elecs., Inc. v. Interdigital Commc’ns, Inc." on Justia Law

by
Plaintiff took exceptions to the Master's Final Report which allowed for the withdrawal of an agreed-upon arbitrator because he had concluded that he could not fairly and objectively resolve plaintiff's dispute with defendant. The Master concluded that ordering arbitration before an arbitrator who admitted his conflicts would serve no useful purpose and that a substitute arbitrator should be designated to resolve the parties' dispute. The court concluded that plaintiff's exceptions to the Master's Final Report were overruled. The Master's Report, with its findings of fact, conclusions of law, and recommended remedy were confirmed and adopted. View "Lynn v. Ullrich" on Justia Law

by
This matter involved the acquisition of R&S by KBR from ENI pursuant to a stock purchase agreement (SPA). At issue was whether the entire escrow fund should be released to ENI or whether it was entitled to a portion of this fund. KBR sought a preliminary injunction of any further proceedings before the arbitrator. The court denied the motion for a preliminary injunction because the issues involved in this request were largely mooted by clarification of the parties' positions during briefing and by clarification of the law by the Supreme Court in Viacom International v. Winchell, which was decided while this matter was being briefed. View "ENI Holdings, LLC v. KBR Group Holdings, LLC" on Justia Law

by
Plaintiff and Defendant entered into a license agreement for the development of boron-based small-molecule drug candidates for the treatment of acne. As part of the agreement, the parties agreed to arbitrate certain disputes. The parties also agreed that each had the right to initiate judicial proceedings to enforce their rights through equitable relief. A dispute arose under the agreement, and Defendant initiated arbitration regarding it. Approximately two weeks later, Plaintiff filed a complaint seeking to enjoin Defendant from proceeding with arbitration and seeking specific performance of the agreement. Defendant moved to dismiss the complaint for lack of subject matter jurisdiction on the grounds that the parties agreed to resolve the claims at issue in arbitration. The Court of Chancery denied Defendant's motion to dismiss, holding that Plaintiff's claims were not subject to mandatory arbitration under the parties' license agreement. View "Medicis Pharm. Corp. v. Anacor Pharms., Inc." on Justia Law

by
Employee was employed by the State's Department of Services for Children, Youth, and their Families (Department). After Employee was injured during the course and scope of his employment, the Department concluded that Employee did not make a sufficient return to work and terminated him. Employee's termination was subject to arbitration under the collective bargaining agreement between the Department and Council 81, the exclusive bargaining agent for certain Department employees. The arbitrator upheld Employee's termination, finding just cause for Employee's dismissal. Council 81, acting on behalf of Employee, challenged the arbitrator's decision. The Court of Chancery granted summary judgment for the State, holding that Council 81 failed to offer a recognized basis for setting aside the contractually bargained for arbitrator's decision. View "Council 81, AFL-CIO v. State" on Justia Law

by
In this derivative action, the parties sought judicial approval of a settlement. Defendants agreed to pay the Fund, on whose behalf the derivative claims were brought, and agreed not to pursue claims for indemnification against the Fund. Certain limited partners in the Fund, including the named plaintiffs, objected to the settlement consideration as inadequate. The court held that the settlement consideration fell within a range of fairness, albeit at the low end. Because the consideration fell within the range of fairness, the court will approve the settlement unless the objectors make the equivalent of a topping bid. View "Forsythe, et al. v. ESC Fund Management Co. (U.S.), Inc., et al." on Justia Law